Graduate Courses

Architecture Design Studio

Design Studio

Instructors: Michael Meredith
Integrated Building Studios

Explores architecture as a social art and the spatial organization of the human environment. Projects include a broad range of problem types, including individual buildings, groups of buildings, urban districts, and landscapes.

Instructors: Paul Lewis
Architecture Design Studio

The Vertical Design Studio emphasizes site organization, the development of building plans, and the accompanying expression of architectural character in three dimensions.

Architecture Design Studio

The Vertical Design Studio emphasizes site organization, the development of building plans, and the accompanying expression of architectural character in three dimensions.

Architecture Design Studio

The Vertical Design Studio emphasizes site organization, the development of building plans, and the accompanying expression of architectural character in three dimensions. It explores architecture as a social art and the spatial organization of the human environment. Projects include a broad range of problem types, including individual buildings, groups of buildings, urban districts, and landscapes.

Thesis Studio

The Master of Architecture Thesis is an independent design project on a theme selected by the student, incorporating research, programming, and site definition.

Instructors: Jesse A. Reiser
Structural Analysis for Architecture

After having taken this class, students are able to: 1) Recognize and explain how external forces (due to people, wind, heat,etc) act upon rigid bodies (eg.a skateboard, bridge, cable and arches, frames, grids and plates, shells and membranes) in the real world, 2) Identify and apply the appropriate analytical approach to quantify how strong such a rigid body is under the applied loading, 3) Write an informed critique about prominent structural designs.

The Environmental Engineering of Buildings, Part I

The first part of a sequence taught over two terms that provides a broad introduction to Building Systems, Environmental Control and Energy Conservation. Sustainable design themes and environmentally responsible practices are stressed throughout and form a backdrop to all the instructional material provided. The fall course focuses on fundamental concepts and provides an introduction to Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Lighting, Acoustical and Life Safety systems. ARC 515, taught in the spring, considers the design process and the integration of these systems into buildings.

Climate Change, Adaptation and Urban Design

Climate change adaptation is a pressing and difficult challenge to urban design, ecological and engineering planning theory and practice. It is clear that architects, planners, engineers and designers have an important role to help cities contend with climate adaptation. This seminar reviews the general state of science and practice of climate change and adaptation with a primary focus on the United States. It looks to the work of Frederick Law Olmsted for some of the theoretical basis of developing an approach to climate adaptation that is democratic and progressive and evaluate the impediments which restrict change.

Instructors: Guy J.P. Nordenson
Elemental Building Function

This course will build a discourse encompassing the many aspects of building function to try to rediscover the best role of the architect. We will attempt to discover what level of functional system knowledge is appropriate for the architect today. A palette of potentially complex topics will be provided to explore building function, but to avoid the seminar becoming overly technical, it will be grounded in the basic elements of function that one might imagine: Aristotle's Air, Fire, Earth, and Water. Air: space and comfort; Fire: energy and operation; Earth: materials and construction; Water: flow and systems

Instructors: Forrest Michael Meggers
Research in Urbanism: Whatever Happened to Urbanism?

In three essays written in 1994, "Bigness, or the problem of Large Manifesto," "Whatever Happened to Urbanism?" and "The Generic City," Koolhaas blames architects for ignoring the facts of urban existence, its increasing complexity, formlessness, incessant flux and variations. And he mocks city planners, likening them to chess players who have lost to computers, threatened by processes that go on of their own accord expanding towards infinity. Taking Rem Koolhaas' statements as a framework, this course asks what has happened to architectural research on `Urbanism' since the 1970s?

Instructors: M. Christine Boyer
M.Arch. Thesis Seminar

This course will support students in the development of a broad range of thesis topics optimized to the faculty of the SoA. A series of exercises will guide students to identify the primary questions that currently structure the discipline and those extra-disciplinary concerns which architecture must engaged today. Throughout the work, analyses of these issues will be linked to contemporary architectural production. All work will be conducted by small teams and will harness the dynamic feedback between specifically architectural problematics and the general logic of contemporary culture in preparation for future thesis work.

Instructors: Elizabeth Diller
Proseminar for Post-Professional M.Arch.

A series of exercises guide students to identify the primary questions that currently structure the discipline and extra-disciplinary concerns which architecture must engaged today. Analyses of these issues are linked to contemporary architectural production. Each week students present from the format list. The focus in the formats and their connections substitute buildings analysis or close readings of texts as isolated arguments, and should help discern the diversity of threads they open. Our goal is to describe value systems and discursive paths used not only to evaluate but also reconstitute architectural practice.

Instructors: Stanley T. Allen
The Philosophy of Urban History

The class introduces students to the branch of the philosophy of history that specializes in cities. Cities are social entities that exist at an intermediate scale between the micro-level of individuals and the macro-level of society as a whole. Social science has tended to focus at those two extremes, while the intermediate meso-level has been neglected. The philosophy of urban history aims at remedying this situation, stressing not only the role of cities as historical actors, but also the role of other meso-level social entities from local communities and institutional organizations to urban regions and provinces.

Introduction to Formal Analysis

Introduction to the primary projective systems that form the foundations of architectural representation and serve as essential tools of formal analysis and design. Coursework is derived from a structured examination of key primary sources by Gaspard Monge, Brook Taylor and Girard Desargues.

Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Architecture

Advanced research in the history of architecture from 1400 to 1750. Topics vary, with the focus each year on important European centers and architects, and on issues related to architectural theory and practice. In fall 2018, this course considers the forms of early modern architectural theory, with particular attention on the history of the architectural book. We explore a set of key genres-including the treatise, the model book, the biography, the construction manual, and the travel narrative-through a close reading of primary sources and direct study of original objects.

Instructors: Carolyn Yerkes
Introduction to the Architecture Profession

The carrying out of architectural services goes beyond design and involves obligations to the public, to clients, to peers and employees. This course deals with the contracts, specifications, technical documentation, project management, and the construction administration phases of architectural services in designing and constructing buildings. The course is required for the Master of Architecture degree unless you have taken Professional Practice in a 5-year program.

Instructors: J. Robert Hillier
Research in Architecture: The Supernormal and the Transgressive

Architecture is understood as having a normalizing function, establishing patterns that are stable, predictable, and to some extent standardized. The right angle is called the normal and it is very hard to find in nature. The right angle belongs to culture, to architecture. Architecture sees itself as the caretaker of the normal. But the normal is not normal. It is a kind of artifact, always produced, never found. It is a construction involving a certain violence. Meanwhile there is a hidden tradition in architecture of the transgressive, work that crosses the lines of the normal, complicating these lines, threatening the limit.

Computing and Imaging in Architecture

This course on digital media infrastructure explores breaking technologies of fabrication, modeling and design based on production pipelines pioneered by the film and gaming industries--pipelines we author in CATIA, McNeel's Rhino/Grasshopper, and Bentley's Generative Components. A series of formal experiments are carried out each culminating in the fabrication of rapid prototypes using the CNC mill and the InVision 3D printer, explicitly challenging conventional modes of practice and seeking insight into new forms of organization, techniques and operative procedures.

Topics in Contemporary Architectural Theory: Postmodern Procedures

The emergence of postmodern architecture coincides with the rise of the white collar worker. Where the modern architect was concerned with industrial labor, the postmodern architect was overrun by paperwork. Not only did an increasingly labyrinthine bureaucracy and regulated profession subtend the production of buildings, but a rich array of clerical protocols entered the logic of design itself. This course explores a series of procedures that came into prominence around 1965, from the survey to the purchase order, that address the often unexpectedly productive encounters between postmodernization and architecture.

Textile Architecture

This seminar examines the theoretical and practical intersections between architecture and woven materials across time, focusing on three key moments: the imagined origins of architecture in a non-Western, a-historical past: textiles' place in transforming built architecture; and twentieth-century experiments in which the figure of cloth allowed for expressing ideas that often exceeded what standing material realities were then possible for architects.

Architecture, Media, and Climate

Architects have long been concerned with the relationship of a building to its climate. Focused on the period surrounding World War II, right before mechanical HVAC systems were widespread, this seminar explores the archive of methodological experiments, media systems, and technological devices that were intended to understand and refine the thermal interior. Many of these explorations took place at Princeton, in architecture and elsewhere. We also explore the conceptual frameworks that allow us to consider architectural-climatic experiments in light of the historiographic and epistemological challenges posed by climate change.

Instructors: Daniel Adam Barber
Topics in Architecture: Building Life - Architecture, Biology, and Modern Space

Michel Foucault has famously argued that 'life itself did not exist' in the eighteenth century and that it only came into being with the establishment of biological science after 1800. This course argues that this modern conception of life was informed by a series of architectonic parameters described by biological and architectural theorists during their common inquiry into the growth and spatial behavior of living organisms. Seminars focus on major evolutionary and environmental issues, including adaptation, optimization, and the spatial claims of natural selection, as well as the building settings of modern biological research.

Instructors: Spyros Papapetros